Cubism

Cubism and Modernism in the Czech Republic

19. 4. 2014

Cubism and Modernism in the Czech Republic

Czech cubism constitutes one of the significant movements of the development of arts and architecture in Central Europe in the first half of the 20th century.

Architecture

Around 1910, a unique form of cubism appeared in Czech architecture with crystalline and round derivations of geometric shapes. Czech architects were the only ones in the world to also apply cubist forms to architecture. The main Czech leading architects of the cubism era were Josef Gocar, who designed the House of the Black Madonna. Another well-known cubist architect was Josef Chochol designing the Diamant department store in Prague.
 
BAUER VILLA – MUSEUM & GALERY
The villa in Libodrice near Kolin is one of the finest examples of Czech cubist architecture. It was designed by the architect Josef Gocar in 1912-14 and it is registered on the state list of immovable cultural heritage.
     
HODEK APARTMENT HOUSE, VILLA KOVAROVIC, TRIPLEX HOUSE
Three cubist buildings in the Vysehrad neighborhood in Prague are designed by the great architect Josef Chochol (1880-1956). Each one of them is recognized masterwork of cubist architecture.
http://www.suzfoto.com/space/architecture/chochol_english.html
 

Design

KUBISTA
Kubista store is located at the House of Black Madonna. Kubista store specializes in Czech Cubist and Art Deco art, offering both originals and replicas. The museum of Czech Cubism is located on the top floor.
 
MODERNISTA
This elegant gallery specializes in furniture and accessories from the first half of the 20th century. Modernista covers every style from Czech Cubism, Functionalism, Bauhaus and Art Deco to Industrial and Mid-Century Modern.
 
ART DECO GALLERY
The Art Deco gallery offers objects of art and decorative arts. The designed items from the Art Deco period (1918 – 1938) are mixing Cubism with various styles and movements of the early 20th century such as Neoclassicism, Constructivism, Modernism, Art Nouveau and Futurism.
 

Arts

Czech sculptor, Otto Gutfreund trained in Prague before spending time in Paris between 1909 and 1910. He was taught by Bourdelle but was more influenced by the Cubist style of Picasso and Braque. He returned to Prague in 1911 and became a member of the Group of Plastic Artists. Their aim was to unite the ideas of Cubism and Expressionism.
 
MUSEUM KAMPA
Cubistic sculptural works by Otto Gutfreund from the period 1911 – 1914.
 
THE MUSEUM OF CZECH CUBISM
House at the Black Madonna, which houses the museum, was built in 1911 as a department store and is itself a monument to Cubism. The angular grace of cubism is apparent in the minimalist and abstract lines of the sculptures, paintings, furniture, ceramics and architecture on show at this small but delightful museum.
 
PICTURE GALLERY OF JOSEF CAPEK (in Capek Brothers Museum)
Josef Capek, first a painter of the Cubist school, later developed his own playful primitive style. He collaborated with his brother Karel on a number of plays and short stories, as a cartoonist, he worked for Lidové Noviny, a newspaper based in Prague.
 
EMIL FILLA GALLERY
Czech artist, Emil Filla lived in France, Germany, and Italy from 1907 to 1914. While there, his style changed from Expressionist to Cubism. He became the leading figure of the Cubist movement in his native country in both painting and sculpture. During World War I, Filla took refuge in the Netherlands, he returned to Prague in 1920 and during World War II was imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp. After his release, he began painting more naturally, creating some landscapes.
 

Information

THE CZECH CUBISM FOUNDATION
The conservation of cultural monuments, especially the architectural works dating from the first half of the 20th century, and the conservation of the applied artwork of designers from the first half of the 20th century.
Support for the renewal and conservation of the cultural heritage of the Czech Republic, the significance of which transcends the limits of the region.
 
 

MODERNISM AND FUNCTIONALISM

(1900-1945)
 
VILLA TUGENDHAT
The Villa Tugendhat is considered a masterpiece of the German architect Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe. Built in 1930 in Brno, in today's Czech Republic, the villa soon became an icon of modern architecture. It is a classic example of functionalism.
 
MULLER VILLA
Muller villa in Prague was completed in 1930 and it’s another icon of modernism in the Czech Republic. The Muller Villa is considered a masterpiece of the architect Adolf Loos.