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P
rague
C
ubism
P
rague
C
astle
At the ancient seat of Bohemian kings you will encounter unique buildings frommany
architectural periods, from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Today the castle is the seat of
the president of the Czech Republic, yet a large part of the complex is still open to the public.
St. Vitus Cathedral
(1) is the largest and most important
church in Prague. Don’t miss the Art Nouveau window
by Alfons Mucha, the Gothic tombs of Czech kings or
the Chapel of St. Wenceslas, the patron saint of the
nation. Inside the chapel, which is richly decorated with
semi-precious stones, there is a room that protects the
Czech crown jewels – a crown, sceptre and orb. They
are displayed on special occasions. Do not overlook the
valuable mosaic above the Golden Gate next to the
entrance to the south tower, from which you can enjoy
spectacular views.
The
Old Royal Palace
(2) served as the residence of
Czech kings until the 16th century. During a tour of
the palace you will see the great Vladislav Hall with its
magnificent late Gothic vaulting.
The
St. George Basilica
(3) enjoys renown as one of
the oldest religious buildings in Central Europe. It was
founded as early as 920, and with the exception of the
facade, which was lavishly rebuilt in the Baroque style, it
retains its Romanesque character.
The colourful little houses with tiny windows and
chimneys in the
Golden Lane
(4) is where until the mid-
20th century craftsmen and artists lived, including Franz
Kafka.
The
Queen Anne Summer Palace
(5) in the Royal
Garden was built for festivities but also for rest and
relaxation. In the park in front of it is the“Singing Fountain”.
The
Daliborka Tower
(6) was part of the castle
fortifications. Today you can see the foundations of the
dungeon, and the tower offers a beautiful view of the
Deer Moat
(7) below Prague Castle – a wooded ravine
where Emperor Rudolf II went to hunt game. The Baroque
Riding School
(8), which is more than 90 metres long,
was where the nobility came to hone their equestrian
skills. It now holds exhibitions of fine art.
Sharp edges, geometric forms and crystalline structures – these are the typical
elements that adorn the facades and also the interiors of buildings created in the
unique architectural style of Czech Cubism.
T I P
On a walk through the centre of Prague, don’t overlook the unique
Cubist lamppost
made of artificial stone, metal and glass on Jungmann
Square (Jungmannovo náměstí). Credited with the preservation of this
lamppost was the world-famous Czech architect Jan Kaplický, who
designed such buildings as the Lord’s Media Centre in London.
Visit the most famous Cubist building, the
House at the Black Madonna
(Ovocný
trh 19), designed by the leading Czech
architect
Josef Gočár
. It houses an original
Cubist café with beautiful chandeliers and light
fixtures and also the Kubista shop, where you
can buy products such as jewellery, ceramics
and light fixtures by designers inspired by this
style. Note the Baroque statue of the Black
Madonna on the corner of the house, which
gave the building its name.
A
walking
tour
of
P
rague
C
ubism
Take a walk past three of the most beautiful
Cubist residential buildings in Prague, designed
by the architect
Josef Chochol
and located
below Vyšehrad. Not far from the Výtoň tram
stop is the opulent
Kovařovic Villa
(Libušina 3).
On the corner of Neklanova and Přemyslova
streets is a masterpiece of architectural Cubism
– a
four-storey residential building
. And
beside the tram line leading from the city centre
to Podolí below Vyšehrad Rock stands the two-
storey
“Triple House”
.
House at the Black Madonna
Panorama of the Hradčany quarter
Cubist ceramics – Pavel Janák
Kovařovic Villa
T I P
Do not miss the ceremonial passing of the
standards and
changing of the guard
at Prague
Castle, which is held with great fanfare every day
at noon in the castle’s first courtyard.
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